What Is a Commercial Energy Audit?

Martin T. Israel

What is a Commercial Energy Audit? The purpose of a commercial energy audit is it to evaluate energy use in commercial buildings. The auditor then makes recommendations to the client as to how to make the building more energy efficient.

Older buildings are often outdated in their use of electric, water and gas. New tax credits from the Federal Government and State governments helps offset the costs of upgrading these buildings to energy efficient buildings.

A commercial Energy Auditing firm is made up of engineers who can determine the amount of energy being wasted by old and inefficient energy systems. Then the engineers determine ways to save the customer money by designing more energy efficient systems.

Engineers prepare HVAC and MEP reports to demonstrate energy efficiency. Engineers can prepare cost evaluations to determine what types of improvements are necessary. The Engineers also prepare energy efficient reports for new construction, renovations and any buildings that need to be modernized and bought up to today’s standards.

The process starts with an Overview audit or walk through audit. This is the stage where the engineer starts reviewing the client’s energy bills and giving recommendations as to more cost effective solutions.

ASHREA Level 1 – Walk Through Analysis

ASHREA Level 1 audits focuses on low-cost/no-cost energy conservation measures. The report determines how much energy costs can be saved from conservation and changes of energy habits.

ASHRE Level 2 audits will measure how long it will take for the energy conservation efforts to pay for themselves. This is a more detailed audit than the Level 1. Level 2 audits will provide more detailed energy study of capital intensive components. There are several tax saving programs that your company can qualify for at the state and federal level.

Commercial Energy Audits are also used for new buildings. These engineers meet with the building developers at the beginning of the project so they can design the most energy efficient buildings possible.

Green is the Word for Today! All new construction is “going green” Today’s world wants energy efficiency in everything from home appliances, heating and cooling. Here are some terms that you may have heard regarding Green Contraction.

LEED – Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. LEED rates the design and functionality of Green Buildings.

Energy STAR – This is an international rating for energy efficient appliances.
LED – Light emitting diocode – used for low intensity light.

Green energy can get very technical, since it is an engineering process. To keep it simple, the less energy wasted the lower your energy bills. Old Air condition units can waste huge amounts of electric. It might be costly to replace that old AC unit, but the cost savings in the long run are well worth it. With the tax credits, these upgrades pay for themselves in no time. Also, you are helping make the planet a little less polluted than it is.

Old cities have very old factories that were built to code way back when. An energy audit can help you bring these factories up to today’s code. It may even be to your company’s advantage to replace the existing structure with a new Energy Efficient Building. If that is not in your business plan, it is amazing what can be done with these old building to keep their charm on the outside and function like a new building on the inside.

Whatever your energy needs, it is in your best interest to have a Commercial Energy Audit on your business. It will save you money, save the environment, and make the workplace more efficient than it was before.

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